Awareness, Advocacy & Action

      Women for Progress

      of Mississippi, Inc.

Women for Progress of MS, Inc. 

KWANZAA  2017

in partnership with 
Mississippi Civil Rights Museum & 
The Greater Jackson Arts Council
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 @ 5:30pm

2017 Theme:

Kasserian ingera - And how are the children?
Kasserian ingera - And how are the children?

Kasserian ingera - And how are the children?

 

Kwanzaa

Created in 1966, Kwanzaa, the African American holiday celebrated from December 26 to January 1 is a celebration that over 18 million African Americans take part in annually.  

 

Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday, nor is it meant to replace Christmas. It was created by Dr. Maulana "Ron" Karenga, a professor of Black Studies, in 1966. At this time of great social change for African Americans, Karenga sought to design a celebration that would honor the values of ancient African cultures and inspire African Americans who were working for progress.


Kwanzaa is based on the year-end harvest festivals that have taken place throughout Africa for thousands of years. The name comes from the Swahili phrase "matunda ya kwanza," which means "first fruits of the harvest." Karenga chose a phrase from Swahili because the language is used by various peoples throughout Africa.


“Kasserian ingera” Masai warriors would always say to another. It means “and how are the children?” Even warriors with no children of their own would always give the traditional answer, “all the children are well.” “All the children are well” means that life is good. It means that the daily struggles of existence do not preclude proper caring for their young.

Adapted by Pat Hoertdoerfer from an excerpt of a speech by Rev. Dr. Patrick T. O’Neill


In the Spirit of Umoja:  “How are the children?”


  • The candle we light for Umoja represents the symbol of unity . . .all of us taking responsibility for our families, children, communities, and neighbors.
  • Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant, Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba, and W. K. Kellogg Foundation appointed members to the "The Better Together Commission" an independent group with 15 members designed to help Jackson Public Schools chart a new path towards change in the district.
  • The Commission's charge reads as follows:
  • The Commission’s charge is to lead efforts to create a bold new vision for educational transformation in the Jackson Public School District. Cooperative Planning, intelligent study and engaged community are our values.

Applying the Principle of Umoja
  • In order for Kwanzaa to truly mean something in Jackson, in the State of Mississippi, in the United States, in the world, we must apply the principles of Kwanzaa to our daily lives.
  • The Black candle represents the value and priority we place on respecting Black lives  and improving our communities and lives of our children.
The candle we light for Umoja represents the symbol of unity . . .all of us taking responsibility for our families, children, communities, and neighbors.
Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant, Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba, and W. K. Kellogg Foundation appointed members to the "The Better Together Commission" an independent group with 15 members designed to help Jackson Public Schools chart a new path towards change in the district.
The Commission's charge reads as follows:
The Commission’s charge is to lead efforts to create a bold new vision for educational transformation in the Jackson Public School District. Cooperative Planning, intelligent study and engaged community are our values.

KWANZAA SCHEDULE 2017

**Free & Open to the Public**

 

Tuesday, December 26, 2017, 5:30 PM
Mississippi Civil Rights Museum
Please download your free tickets NOW! Limited seats available....

 www.kwanzaacelebration2017.eventbrite.com

Kwanzaa 2013 Photo Gallery